DREAMERS and Immigration Reform. What is needed?

Immigration Reform is here and Dreamers can get a work permit and get to be here legally if they qualify. Brian Lerner states that Dreamers has been able to apply for DACA or Deferred Action for the last 2-3 years. However, with the new immigration reform for Dreamers, we now have an expanded DACA and more people will qualify for Dreamers.

Brian D. Lerner, Immigration Attorney states that the following list is the general requirements of the immigration reform for Dreamers:

The program will be open to individuals who:

  1. Came to the United States before reaching your 16th birthday;
  2. Have continuously resided in the United States since January 1, 2010, up to the present time;
  3. Were physically present in the United States on June 15, 2012, and at the time of making your request for consideration of deferred action with USCIS;
  4. Had no lawful status on June 15, 2012;
  5. Are currently in school, have graduated or obtained a certificate of completion from high school, have obtained a general education development (GED) certificate, or are an honorably discharged veteran of the Coast Guard or Armed Forces of the United States; and
  6. Have not been convicted of a felony, significant misdemeanor,or three or more other misdemeanors, and do not otherwise pose a threat to national security or public safety.

Brian Lerner, immigration attorney states that the difference between this immigration reform for Dreamers and the last Immigration Reform for Dreamers is that it first takes out the upper age requirement. Basically, one could not be older than 31 years old at the time that the first immigration reform Dreamers was made. Now, they can be as old as they are. However, the applicant, in accordance with Brian D. Lerner, must have not been older than 16 years old when he or she entered the United States.

Additionally, another element with the new immigration reform is that instead of having to be physically present from all the way back in 2007, they can now show that they have been physically present since 2010. Otherwise, the immigration reform for Dreamers is basically the same. One item of concern is that you have to look at the last item regarding the criminal history of the applicant. Now, with the new immigration reform for Dreamers, there is also a rather comprehensive memo from the director of Department of Homeland Security which makes clear that someone may be under priority 1, priority 2 or priority 3 or no priority at all for immigration enforcement. Thus, there is the interplay between the immigration reform for Dreamers requirement that somebody not have been convicted of a felony or significant misdemeanor or 3 or more other misdemeanors and how that interacts with the enforcement memo. Brian Lerner also states that the definition of what is a ‘significant’ misdemeanor and/or felony seems to have been clarified somewhat by the new priority memo. Assumably, if somebody qualifies for the immigration reform for Dreamers, they will not be deported – even if under a certain priority category for enforcement.  Brian Lerner states we will have to see how this plays out and hope that the immigration officials will follow properly the executive order as well as the new policy memorandum on enforcement priorities.

As  usual, with immigration reform for Dreamers, there are questions and ambiguities and issues that need to be resolved. However, in the end, it is a good expansion of the immigration reform for Dreamers and is constitutional under the law.

About Author

Brian Lerner

Many years ago, Brian D. Lerner has passed a rigorous examination and extensive experience requirements by the State Bar of California, Board of Legal Specialization. He can handle the most difficult of immigration cases arising from business visas, work permits, Green Cards, non-immigrant visas, deportation, citizenship, appeals and all other areas of immigration. He received his B.S. Degree in Business Administration, with an emphasis on Computer Information Systems, from the University of Southern California. He graduated from the University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law with a Juris Doctorate degree.

Mr. Lerner is admitted to the United States Supreme Court, the California Supreme Court and the U.S. Courts of Appeals for the 11th, 10th, 9th, 8th, 6th, 5th, 4th, 3rd, 2nd and 1st Circuits. This means that he can prepare and file all Circuit Court of Appeals and U.S. Supreme Court cases.
As for all immigration matters at the Immigration Courts, USCIS, BICE, BCBP, BALCA, Department of Labor, and the Board of Immigration Appeals, our firm can prepare all matters in every state in the United States, Puerto Rico and Guam. Mr. Lerner has traveled all over the United States to help people with their immigration needs.

Mr. Lerner can handle the toughest of deportation cases as well as any appeal, Petition for Review or Motion to Reopen case. Mr. Lerner is frequently present in immigration court, representing individuals in deportation, removal, waiver asylum, withholding of removal and adjustment of status hearings. He has prepared numerous appellate briefs to the Board of Immigration Appeals and other appellate boards at the Bureau of Citizenship and Immigration Services. He has appealed and argued cases in the Circuit Court of Appeals all over the United States.

Mr. Lerner has prepared business visas for individuals from all over the world. Our firm has clients from practically every continent on Earth. His visa experience extends to Treaty Traders, Treaty Investors, Intercompany Transferees, Speciality Occupations, Training programs, and NAFTA visas. He has extensive experience in most all other types of visas issued. In addition to his visa experience, Mr. Lerner has prepared Multinational Manager, National Interest Waiver and Extraordinary Alien petitions for highly qualified foreigners.

Mr. Lerner’s clients are from all over the United States and many countries around the world. Immigration Law is Federal Law. Therefore, a petition or application would be prepared the same in Texas, Florida, or any other State as it would in California. It is more important for you to make sure that you have an expert attorney in Immigration Law prepare your case, rather than a lawyer who happens to be local. There is too much at stake to just give your case to anyone.

Mr. Lerner will fight for you and your family. Since he is married to an immigrant himself, he is committed to helping people from all around the world to come to the United States to realize their dream.