The new immigration reform bill makes changes to prosecutorial discretion

immigration reform usa 2014 newsThe immigration reform bill just issued by President Obama is actually not a ‘bill’ per se, but rather, an executive order. One part of the order was a comprehensive memo by the Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security that changed, altered and made in some respects clearer the priorities for deporting people and/or putting people in deportation proceedings.

Brian D. Lerner, Immigration Attorney, states that the immigration reform bill that deals with priorities has three major parts. The highest priority is referred to as Priority 1, second highest is Priority 2 and of course the third and least preference is Priority 3. Therefore, states Brian Lerner, if you will be requesting prosecutorial discretion and you are under Priority 3 of the immigration reform bill, you should have the highest chance of success.

Watch Brian Lerner speak about the immigration reform bill about enforcement priorities on prosecutorial discretion

Priority 3 of the immigration reform bill states as follows: Priority 3 (other immigration violations): Priority 3 aliens are those who have been issued a final order of removal on or after January 1, 2014. The immigration reform bill states that aliens described in this priority, who are not also described in Priority 1 or 2, represent the third and lowest priority for apprehension and removal. Hence, states Brian Lerner, it is listed by the Secretary of Homeland Security that is the lowest priority. This is quite interesting, because usually somebody with a prior removal order will get one of the highest priorities from immigration.

Resources should be dedicated accordingly to aliens in this priority according to the immigration reform bill. Priority 3 aliens should generally be removed unless they qualify for asylum or another form of relief under our laws or, unless, in the judgment of an immigration officer, the alien is not a threat to the integrity of the immigration system or there are factors suggesting the alien should not be an enforcement priority. Unfortunately, it is this part of Priority 3 of the immigration reform bill that gives most concern. It puts a great deal of discretion in the officer at the lowest levels the ability to basically believe that removing somebody is always an enforcement priority. Brian Lerner states that it is this section that also is the most ambiguous and unclear. Perhaps in the months to come before the regulations are issued, there will be clarification as to this last part of Priority 3.

Immigration reform 2014 newsBrian D. Lerner explains in more detail the immigration reform bill and its reference to a ‘final order of removal’. It is necessary, explains Brian Lerner to know what is meant by the term ‘final order of removal’. An order of removal made by the immigration judge at the conclusion of proceedings under section 240 of the Act shall become final: (a) Upon dismissal of an appeal by the Board of Immigration Appeals; (b) Upon waiver of appeal by the respondent; (c) Upon expiration of the time allotted for an appeal if the respondent does not file an appeal within that time; (d) If certified to the Board or Attorney General, upon the date of the subsequent decision ordering removal; (e) If an immigration judge orders an alien removed in the alien’s absence, immediately upon entry of such order; or (f) If an immigration judge issues an alternate order of removal in connection with a grant of voluntary departure, upon overstay of the voluntary departure period, or upon the failure to post a required voluntary departure bond within 5 business days. Brian Lerner states that if the respondent has filed a timely appeal with the Board, the order shall become final upon an order of removal by the Board or the Attorney General, or upon overstay of the voluntary departure period granted or reinstated by the Board or the Attorney General.

The immigration reform bill does give a lot of hope to the families and to foreign nationals here in the U.S. However, Brian Lerner states there are ambiguities in the Priorities memo and you should get an experienced attorney to help you.

About Author

Brian Lerner

Many years ago, Brian D. Lerner has passed a rigorous examination and extensive experience requirements by the State Bar of California, Board of Legal Specialization. He can handle the most difficult of immigration cases arising from business visas, work permits, Green Cards, non-immigrant visas, deportation, citizenship, appeals and all other areas of immigration. He received his B.S. Degree in Business Administration, with an emphasis on Computer Information Systems, from the University of Southern California. He graduated from the University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law with a Juris Doctorate degree.

Mr. Lerner is admitted to the United States Supreme Court, the California Supreme Court and the U.S. Courts of Appeals for the 11th, 10th, 9th, 8th, 6th, 5th, 4th, 3rd, 2nd and 1st Circuits. This means that he can prepare and file all Circuit Court of Appeals and U.S. Supreme Court cases.
As for all immigration matters at the Immigration Courts, USCIS, BICE, BCBP, BALCA, Department of Labor, and the Board of Immigration Appeals, our firm can prepare all matters in every state in the United States, Puerto Rico and Guam. Mr. Lerner has traveled all over the United States to help people with their immigration needs.

Mr. Lerner can handle the toughest of deportation cases as well as any appeal, Petition for Review or Motion to Reopen case. Mr. Lerner is frequently present in immigration court, representing individuals in deportation, removal, waiver asylum, withholding of removal and adjustment of status hearings. He has prepared numerous appellate briefs to the Board of Immigration Appeals and other appellate boards at the Bureau of Citizenship and Immigration Services. He has appealed and argued cases in the Circuit Court of Appeals all over the United States.

Mr. Lerner has prepared business visas for individuals from all over the world. Our firm has clients from practically every continent on Earth. His visa experience extends to Treaty Traders, Treaty Investors, Intercompany Transferees, Speciality Occupations, Training programs, and NAFTA visas. He has extensive experience in most all other types of visas issued. In addition to his visa experience, Mr. Lerner has prepared Multinational Manager, National Interest Waiver and Extraordinary Alien petitions for highly qualified foreigners.

Mr. Lerner’s clients are from all over the United States and many countries around the world. Immigration Law is Federal Law. Therefore, a petition or application would be prepared the same in Texas, Florida, or any other State as it would in California. It is more important for you to make sure that you have an expert attorney in Immigration Law prepare your case, rather than a lawyer who happens to be local. There is too much at stake to just give your case to anyone.

Mr. Lerner will fight for you and your family. Since he is married to an immigrant himself, he is committed to helping people from all around the world to come to the United States to realize their dream.